thepiemakerandthegirlnamedchuck:

thefoodispeople:

dottewa:

a-void-reality:

GO WATCH THIS SHOW, HONESTLY IT IS SO AMAZING. 

IF THIS POST CREATES 1 NEW PUSHING DAISIES FAN MY LIFE = MADE. 

Alright let me help out then:

1) Most of the cast is female. In fact only two main characters are male.

2) Both male characters take typically non-masculine hobbies. Emerson Cod knits almost non-stop and makes pop-up books. Ned is literally called “The Pie-Maker” because he bakes homestyle pies from his mother’s method. Both are shown to be very nurturing and even maternal characters. Conversely, the women? A pair of professional travelling show performers that have gritty sexual scandals the way men usually get (see the entire “Chuck’s father” storylines), a beekeeper who is the single most positive and optimistic character imaginable, and a former professional jockey- Three of four pro athletes.

3) You could very easily make the claim Ned is asexual.

4) Yes, the storyline is about romance. But it’s also about the positive side of a love story, and their only drama lies in overcoming their inability to actually share contact.

5) A very good friend of mine recommended this show to me as “Disney for adults.” I told her it was already on my list to watch because “It’s by Bryan Fuller, from Wonderfalls and Dead Like Me.” Bryan Fuller is now most known for “Hannibal.” The same camera methods and bright colours and lighting techniques Hannibal is known for? Perfected in this show, just using a different tone- The same colour methods in reverse, upping the vivid greens and yellows instead of reds and blues, which sells emotion both ways.

7) Probably one of the best examples of a modern day fairy tale possible.

8) Narrated by Jim Dale- The narrator for the HP audio books.

I don’t know if anyone’s already added links to this, but all of these here work and if you hover over the links, an episode description shows :)

Season 1:

  1. Pie-Lette
  2. Dummy
  3. The Fun in Funeral
  4. Pigeon
  5. Girth
  6. Bitches
  7. Smell of Success
  8. Bitter Sweets
  9. Corpsicle

Season 2:

  1. Bzzzzzzzzz!
  2. Circus Circus
  3. Bad Habits
  4. Frescorts
  5. Dim Sum Lose Some
  6. Oh Oh Oh… It’s Magic
  7. Robbing Hood
  8. Comfort Food
  9. The Legend of Merle McQuoddy
  10. The Norwegians
  11. Window Dressed to Kill
  12. Water & Power
  13. Kerplunk

Guys, if you could reblog this it would be great! Let’s spread the word about this amazing show!

aber-flyingtiger:

rupeerose:

teafortrouble:

megg33k:

I need feminism because most men’s restrooms still aren’t equipped with baby changing stations. As someone who was married to a man who had sole custody of his young son, I’m hyperaware that feminism means EQUALITY, not female superiority. Feminism should and does support a man’s right to be as much of a parent to his child(ren) as any mother is allowed/expected to be.

This is a constant problem for Mr. Tea and myself. We’ve got twins, so even though I can change one kid on the change table in the ladies’ room, he’s left standing sort of awkwardly in the lobby with a messy child while I change one, come back, and get the other.

Nobody’s suggesting that men aren’t parents, so the lack of change tables goes well beyond ‘gender role reinforcing’ and straight into ‘ridiculous’.

My dad actually almost got kicked out of a mall once for changing my brother in the womens room of a mall. The only reason they didn’t call the cops on him was because the ladies in the room supported him.

I’d never even considered this but I support it

algrenion:

overlypolitebisexual:

whenever i see these post-apocalyptic films set in the USA where everyone is pretty much just killing each other with no mention of other nations i always just assume that the rest of the world is fine and has learnt how to resume life as normal

 

greencarnations:

somethingwittythiswaycomes:

autisticadvocacy:

overtflannel:

exaltedreviewaverse:

autistic-alligator:

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]

deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.

I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.

Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.

If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.

At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.

During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.

The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.

There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.

We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.

In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:

  • Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
  • Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
  • In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
  • Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.

This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?

Thank you for reading.

I think I’ve left some good information in this response and it may be a good read for some of our followers.  Just a bit of history and a couple concepts in disability advocacy.

~Sam

Curb-cutter effect: I should use this term more often.

Ahhh, there’s even symbols, for the peeps with color-blindness!

Also: “curb-cutter effect.” I learn something new everyday! And the badge is super relevant to anime/gaming/comics convention spaces for its original intent, given that there tends to be a greater number of peeps on the spectrum there than in the general public, anyway.

I wish for convention spaces there was some way to use these without blocking the attendee badge (A built in side-panel, with slim versions of the cards? Or full sized cards behind the badge, which would itself be slimmer than the badge-carrier-plastic-thingy, so the communication info showed off to one side?), or suffering the same fate as that one - constantly freaking flipping around. Also a way to view it from behind would be epic (and serve as a subconscious reminder that you should probably also not, like, TOUCH people without warning…), but a tricky design problem. Badges are way easier to make en masse than shoulder-patches, and you couldn’t necessarily see the symbol on someone’s shoulder….hmmm.

Outside the box thinkers, deploy!

Random related note: A good number of security staffers prone to sensory overload took refuge in the Manga Cafe - a quiet library-like space - at KitsuneKon. If your con has something similar, and you need a breather, A+ Would Recommend. Check your handbooks.

A FURTHER PEE ESS: If you throw your dollahs at things like Autism Speaks in the name of awareness and support, I would highly HIGHLY suggest you check out the Autism Self Advocacy Network (ASAN) that Sam mentions instead. By autistics, for autistics, and none of the incredibly vile practices that AS gets its gross self up to.

A message from ASAN’s President: 

"Hi folks,
 
We’re so glad to see that this poster and the color communication badge system is getting so much circulation - the poster in question was actually from ASAN’s 2013 Annual Gala. If you’re interested in learning more about using the Color Communication Badges, you can find out more information here.
 
We actually would love to see these used more at general conferences, including by non-autistic people. The Color Communication Badge system is more effective the more people use it, and it is very much intended to be used as a “universal design” accommodation for all people, with and without disabilities. If any conferences would be interested in working with us to introduce the color communication badges to their events, please feel free to contact us at info@autisticadvocacy.org.
 
We’d love to hear from you.
 
Warm regards,
Ari Ne’eman
President
Autistic Self Advocacy Network”

What about colour-coded lanyards with the symbol printed along it? Then you can clip your con badge to that and it’s easily visible/ won’t flip around backwards. 

SHIT YEAH THAT’S PERFECT. Sherlock Seattle did a thing like that but for whether people wanted pictures taken of them or not.

clacing:

wormstash:

#my heart is shattering because of this photoset #I have to applaud colin for his acting because he has these expressions for merlin that utterly tear me apart #and they seem so insignificant #but merlin’s spent his entire life being more powerful than everyone else he knows #and yet he gets clothes thrown in his face every day #he could fucking obliterate those clothes #but he doesn’t because he’s good and loyal and faithful and courageous #courageous enough to let people think he’s little more than a servant #and that’s so brave #because as humans we want to say HEY I’M GOOD AT THIS SHIT and when people wrong us we want to stand up to them #and /prove/ that we’re stronger #and it takes so much inner strength to suppress that for the sake of others #and he does #and he never snaps (hell knows I would’ve eventually) and he never fully gives in no matter how tempting it becomes #because he’s strong #stronger than arthur will ever know#but despite it all when no ones looking #he’ll always give these raw expressions#his little moments of indulgence into that weaker part of him #that just cannot stand the life he adheres to #the cards he willingly deals himself day in and day out #for arthur’s sake #and colin is absolutely brilliant for putting merlin’s tiny moments of vulnerability on display #and every time I see them #my heart aches because no one will ever know just how beautiful merlin is #not even the person he cares for the most in the entire world 

"The gods envy us. They envy us because we’re mortal, because any moment may be our last. Everything is more beautiful because we’re doomed. You will never be lovelier than you are now. We will never be here again."


Homer 

Favorite quote from The Iliad.

(via goforthandbeawesome)

Crowley: Better enjoy the pleasures of life on earth while I can
Crowley: *goes to visit Aziraphale*

ophelies:

harry potter + the major arcana // insp.
 Anonymous
What do you think Tolkien's Dwarves' religion looks like?

bitka-goyke:

notbecauseofvictories:

like Terry Pratchett’s, but taken seriously.

  (notbecauseofvictories)

http://medievalpoc.tumblr.com/post/81786434634/theletteraesc-medievalpoc-fuckyeahalejandra

idriveahyundaimovietheatre:

medievalpoc:

whitefriartuck:

theletteraesc:

medievalpoc:

fuckyeahalejandra replied to your post: Ancient Art Week! Various Roman Sculpt…

Are these sculptures of roman citizens or slaves?

The association of Black people with enslavement is an entirely modern invention, as in, chattel slavery in the…

Regarding the whole ‘men hunted, women gave birth’ thing (and wildly off topic from racism in classical Rome, sorry), it is looking increasingly like a load of nonsense (no surprise). 

There are prehistoric hunting scenes showing hunts which (probably *1) show women hunting for one thing and despite this male researcers still declares that men hunted and men created these hunting scenes and were also the first artists. But now we know that these hunting scenes not only show women hunting in some cases but WERE PRODUCED BY WOMEN primarily!

So what evidence for male = hunter is there?

When you look at the evidence for male hunters you have gender bias (men obviously hunted because men hunt now), gender essentialism (men hunted because they had less body fat and didn’t need to produce babies and Reasons) and ethnographic evidence (indigenous Australian hunters were solely male in the 19th-20th centuries).

We assume that because violent activities today are associated with men while women nurtured young that has always been the way. We also assume that women who were not pregnant would be compelled to behave in the same way as women who were pregnant/looking after children. It also assumes that hunting was much more dangerous than it probably was, hunters were often as much scavengers as far as we can tell from archaeological evidence of kill sites and often employed tactics like driving pray off cliffs to die or into dead ends were they could be picked off more safely. That isn’t to say it was completely safe of course. But who is to say gathering was necessarily safe in an age where a simple cut could result in death from infection and there were no anti-bodies for the admittedly few venomous creatures in Europe or that the gatherers would be free from the attentions of now extinct predators.

Much of the ethnographic evidence comes either from African nomadic peoples which have still had thousands of years of contact with patriarchal cultures or Australian Aboriginal and Papua New Guinean groups. The ethnographic observations were made in the 19th and 20th centuries and are deeply racist because they were based on the assumption that these cultures were primitive and unchanging since settlement of Sahul (Australia + New Guinea when they were connected) 50,000 years ago! We know, for example, in the early nineteenth century the power structure of Australian indigenous populations shifted in favour of young men after various epidemics killed 90% of the Aboriginal population in the space of 50 years or thereabout (something we never learnt in school, funnily enough). We do not know who hunted prior to European colonisation of Australia. We guess and the further back in time you go the more problematic that becomes because the hundreds at least indigenous cultures in Australia have all evolved over time just like any other culture.

IF we accept the creators of the hunting scenes across Europe were hunters themselves then we have to accept that women were as likely to be hunters as men. If we do not want to accept that the people who made the art were hunters then we have no evidence beyond ethnographic evidence for males solely being hunters and then we have to look carefully at the ethnographic evidence and accept it is deeply, deeply problematic.

So, in my opinion as a humble archaeology undergraduate, we either accept we have no firm evidence to say men or women hunted, just that hunting was done. If you accepted the cave paintings as evidence of male hunters when they were believed to be produced by men you should also accept they are now evidence of female hunting.

If you think you can say with certainty that ‘women have always been subjected to men because Reasons’ then you have no clue what you are talking about.Sadly much of the scholarship on the subject assumes male = hunter and works forward from that, trying to justify the assumption rather than addressing the actual evidence. Because if we accept that there is no evidence for that then it undermines a lot of nonsense gender essentialism used to handwave away sexism in society today. 

Sources:

Australian Archaeology by Peter Hiscock

Cave paintings created by women

Lectures, seminars, lost media articles etc. 

Image source

*1 Of course it is ‘accepted’ (read: assumed) that all the figures are male by default unless there are obvious feminine traits as opposed to just representing people in general.

Oh my god, I could not have said that nearly as well as you did.

This is such a concise and accessible explanation of why and how so much of what we “know” about the ancient world, prehistory, and a lot of history in general has almost EVERYTHING to do with looking for confirmation of reflections of our CURRENT SOCIETY, and any academic with a lick of honesty will tell you the same thing.

My graduate adviser tells a story about doing her dissertation research in Normandy in the 1970s, where she delved into the civic archives of Caen to study the role of women in early modern commerce. The other academic working there was an older French man (my adviser is an American woman), and he guffawed at her research plans and greatly despised her working there alongside him, a “real” historian studying “serious” history. He insisted repeatedly that there were no women working in commerce in France at that time, and that there were only men.

My adviser soldiered on despite having to work while facing directly at this man every single day. As she began her research, she began finding women “hiding” in plain sight, listed right alongside men in the tax rolls and notarized sales that they were both studying. She found hundreds of women engaging in buying and selling, and happily shoved these documents right in the face of her detractor, who now insisted that these women, who had not existed in his mind the day before, were simply “unimportant”. 

My point: our biases are so powerful that we can literally look at documents and not see the names on the paper, if we believe that those names should not be there. How much of our narrative self-perpetuates, as generations of scholars find support for preexisting biases by simply overlooking the contradictory evidence staring right back at them?


while I’m out here, slogging through the mud, breathing fire,
and getting stabbed to death

starshipsorceress:

pitchpipestarkid:

That’s it. That’s the show.

#i just made myself sad realizing that Merlin is just a teenager sometimes
#he rebels and gets in trouble with his dad #he gets lazy and skives off his chores #he misses home and his mother and his best friend the way things used to be #he doesn’t clean his room and then trips over things when he’s too tired to move them #and then he’s forced to hold other’s lives in his hands #and wield a power so immense he can barely comprehend it
#and strike people down in the name of a man who can never even know let alone appreciate it #he was probably 18 when he got to Camelot #and by the time he was 19 he’d killed probably 15 people #not including bandits or raiders or the like in big battles #15 individual people intentionally killed face to face #everything hurts and i need to go to bed now (via clotpolesonly)

IM NOT CRYING YOU’RE CRYING

edgebug:

sincerely, a person who has been on prozac for 9 years

this is in response to some shitty stuff i’ve seen on my dash recently. it’s super simplified, so if you’d like to know some more indepth stuff on how exactly it works, google it—OR BETTER YET actually talk to a mental health doctor psychiatrist person wow

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.

ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.

the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 

"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get

"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.

"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."

Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 

"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.

Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

  (via crystalandrock)

madmaudlingoes:

bropakpro:

touch-my-cuboner:

zecretary:

zecretary:

the stereotype that women talk more than men is infinitely amusing to me because men are literally incapable of shutting the fuck up

i hope this post gets popular enough that i hurt a man’s feelings

It’s not a stereotype it’s a proven fact you femanazi piece of shit.

lmao there it is 

You wanna talk proven facts? This shit’s been done, son: researcher Dale Spender in Australia used audio and video tape to independently evaluate who talked the most in mixed-gender university classroom discussions. Regardless of the gender ratio of the students, whether the instructor was deliberately trying to encourage female participation or not, men always talked more—whether the metric was minutes of talking or number of words spoken. 

Moreover, men literally have no clue how much they talk. When Spender asked students to evaluate their perception of who talked more in a given discussion, women were pretty accurate; but men perceived the discussion as being “equal” when women talked only 15% of the time, and the discussion as being dominated by women if they talked only 30% of the time.

Spender’s conclusion, if I may parahprase: you only think we talk too much because you’d rather we were silent.

Don’t fuck with me, asshole, I’m a scientist.

Edit: I can’t believe I got her name wrong multiple times. The researcher in question is Dale Spender and the original publication of this research was called Man Made Language (1980).

♦FF